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Chestnut Associates

We keep the heart of your business safe

Call us today on 07770 302504  |  Email  |  FREE 15min Consultation

Chestnut Associates

We keep the heart of your business safe

Call us today on 07770 302504  |  Email  |  FREE 15min Consultation

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Winter Driving

By Joanne Hunt
Friday, December 11, 2020

Driving in the Winter

I would highly recommend checking your car/van on a weekly basis, this is something I do every weekend all year around.

Driving in Winter

Due to cold conditions, coupled with the increased chance of wet, icy, and snow-covered road surfaces, can lead to stopping distances doubling if the road surface is wet. These distances increasing by tenfold if the road surface is icy or covered with snow. In addition, cold, clear and sunny winter days can also bring additional hazards such as strong glare which can prove to be blinding for many motorists.

The conditions outlined can all increase the level of risk for the road user. Whether driving for business or pleasure, the risks should not be ignored.

If you have ever broken down, you will no doubt agree that it is not a pleasant experience, especially if you had to wait for you vehicle to be recovery while standing at the side of the road or on the hard shoulder of motorway on a cold winter’s day.

Therefore, you need to be prepared to handle the difficult driving conditions that might result during the forthcoming winter months.

Pre-driving checks

Here are a few checks you can carry out to make sure you and your vehicle are prepared for winter driving:

  • Make sure your vehicle is in a road worthy condition.
  • Always check the weather forecast before you start your journey, if the weather is looking particularly bad then delay your trip until the weather has improved.
  • Plan your route before you start your journey, let someone know your route and expected time of arrival, always allow extra time for winter journeys.
  • Always keep a full tank of fuel you never know when you might get delayed.
  • Ensure that you have suitable breakdown cover.
  • Keep your lights, windows and mirrors clean and free from ice and snow, remember to also clear the snow from the roof of your vehicle before you start your journey.
  • Make sure wipers and lights are in good working order.
  • Add anti-freeze to the radiator and winter additive to the windscreen washer bottles.
  • Check that tyres have plenty of tread depth and are maintained at the correct pressure
  • Carry a winter driving kit in case of emergency, this might include, a snow/ice scraper, fully charged mobile phone, de-icer, winter coats for all passengers etc.

Motorists need to be fully aware of the road conditions during the winter months and be prepared to adapt to the ongoing changing conditions. Even the most experienced drivers can find themselves getting into difficulties.

Legal obligations for employers

Private motorists in the UK must meet certain legal obligations. These include holding a valid driving licence, registering the vehicle, insuring and taxing the vehicle, and ensuring a valid MOT certificate is available for the vehicle is applicable.

However, there are additional legal obligations the employer must comply with when employees are required to drive while at work. Managing the risks to employees who drive at work requires more than just the employer’s compliance with UK road traffic legislation.

The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 requires every employer to undertake an assessment of the risks to the health and safety of their employees and others who may be affected by their work-based activities. These risk assessments will need to include details of the time their employees spend driving while at work, whether this is in a company or hired vehicle, or in the employee’s own vehicle.

The risk assessments will need to identify any risks that result from any work-based driving activities. The assessments will also need to highlight the control measures that have been introduced by the employer to manage those risks.

The regulations require that work-based driving risk assessments are available, and that the assessments are reviewed periodically by the employer to ensure they remains valid and compliant. Employers need consider the risks to employees who drive on Company business in the same way as for any other employee.

If you need any support or advice please email me joanne@chestnutassociates.co.uk

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